Archive for March, 2013

April is Texas State Parks Month at Whole Earth Provision Co.


For the second year in a row, April is Texas State Parks Month at Whole Earth Provision Co. Throughout the month you’ll be able to make donations at the cash register to help support our Texas State Parks. You can make a donation in any amount, but for a $20 donation, you’ll receive a $5 Texas State Park gift card redeemable for Park entrance fees and merchandise at State Park stores throughout Texas.

The donations will be used to help with day-to-day operational expenses at more than 90 State Parks. Enhancing visitor programs, maintaining Park facilities and purchasing lawn mowers are just a few of the ways our donations can help.

On your next visit to your favorite Whole Earth store, don’t forget to pick up a free copy of the Texas State Park Guide. It offers a wealth of information about Parks all around Texas. Few states can boast of the range of landscapes, historical sites and outdoor activities available in our State Parks. Whether you’re looking for a daytrip destination or for an extended stay, the Park Guide is filled with great ideas.

On April 28th from 2 to 4 pm, Park Rangers will be on hand in all Whole Earth stores to answer your questions. If, in the meantime, you’re looking for suggestions about Parks close to home, check out your city’s location page on our website. It includes a list of State Parks close by.

Another way to support Texas State Parks is to purchase tickets to the Banff World Tour and Radical Reels film festivals. World Tour will be shown in Austin at the Paramount Theater on Sunday April 14th and in Houston at the Alamo Drafthouse Vintage Park on Tuesday April 16th. Radical Reels will be shown in Austin at the Paramount on Saturday April 13th. World Tour and Radical Reels present some of the best outdoor adventure and high adrenaline sports films from the recent Banff Mountain Film Festival in Banff, Alberta. The proceeds from these shows will also be directed to Texas State Parks.

Last year, Whole Earth raised more than $30,000, combining in-store customer donations and ticket sale proceeds. We hope you will join us in supporting our Texas State Parks once again and help us beat last year’s total with a donation and a visit to see Radical Reels and Banff World Tour films. And last of all, the best way to support our Parks, is to visit them!

What We’re Reading March 29, 2013

A baby picture of our universe, a man consumed with restoring order to the world, and a Medieval help desk are just a few of the items we were sharing with each other here at Whole Earth this week.


Last week the European Space Agency published photos of our universe as an infant, a mere 380,000 years old. According to the Times, the universe proved to be fatter and lumpier than expected.


We should be grateful that Ursus Wehrli wasn’t around in the early days after the Big Bang. He’d have tidied things up right away and left us living in a more organized but far less interesting universe. Brain Pickings offers a few pages from his latest book The Art of Clean Up.


Medieval Help Desknever gets old. It was first shown on Norwegian Television back in 2001. Here it is, with English subtitles, documenting that difficult, but little-remembered transition from the scroll to the book.

This is yet another in a series of posts about what we’re reading at Whole Earth: stories about the environment, ecology, travel, outdoor living, ideas, art, writing, history, science, and creativity, and the people who make it happen. Have a suggestion? Please leave us a comment so we can add it to our reading list.

WHAT WE’RE READING MARCH 22, 2013

A new way to organize your bookshelf, another magical, digital tool from NASA, and a free mending library – these are just a few of the fun articles we shared this week.

Artist Nina Katchadourian

Is it a new form of storytelling or a fun way to organize your bookshelves?

NASA Science Visualization Wall

NASA is bringing us new ways to look at our world through the magic of digital imagery. Remember our links to the Science on a Sphere and the PBS Nova special Earth from Space? Here’s the latest from NASA: the NASA Science Visualization Wall.

Photo: Gil Regio Jr

“My small act is mostly a gesture and for some it means a lot but I think the bigger importance is the example of participating, of being a citizen and acting outside of what is normal.”

This is yet another in a series of posts about what we’re reading at Whole Earth: stories about the environment, ecology, travel, outdoor living, ideas, art, writing, history, science, and creativity, and the people who make it happen. Have a suggestion? Please leave us a comment so we can add it to our reading list.

What We’re Reading March 18, 2013

Despite all the excitement of SXSW, we still had time to read this week. Remembering our personal history through recipes, the search for the origins of consciousness and a quick tour of some of the oldest living things on the planet make up this week’s offering.

Reflections on the Dawn of Consciousness: Julian Jaynes's Bicameral Mind Theory Revisited - Marcel Kuijsten

from the Julian Jaynes Society - Marcel Kuijsten

Back in 1976, The Origin of Consciousness in the Break-Down of the Bicameral Mind was the book to be seen reading if you were interested in big ideas. So how does it hold up today?

La Llareta in the Atacama Desert, Chile - Rachel Sussman

La Llareta in the Atacama Desert, Chile - Rachel Sussman

Rachel Sussman takes us on a tour of some of the oldest living things on our planet. Unbelievably, the oldest has been around for at least 400,000 years!

photo - Edra Kiesk

photo - Edra Ziesk

“What I’m looking for when I hunt through my recipe collection isn’t really Hot Milk Sponge Cake. It’s a connection to my personal history, a road map of where I’ve been and who I’ve known.”


This is yet another in a series of posts about what we’re reading at Whole Earth: stories about the environment, ecology, travel, outdoor living, ideas, art, writing, history, science, and creativity, and the people who make it happen. Have a suggestion? Please leave us a comment so we can add it to our reading list.

An evening with Horse Boy Foundation

Rupert Isaacson, Horse Boy Foundation

It was a thrilled audience at the Austin Lamar Whole Earth store recently, when The Horseboy Foundation founder, Rupert Isaacson, brought two of his superbly trained horses by the store. He did a show and tell presentation of his unorthodox method of aiding autistic youngsters gain direct communication by relating to horses – as well as through wilderness, nature and movement in general. The presentation was heartwarming and beautifully hopeful, but when Rupert brought the horse shown above into the store – all the way back in, then.. rode her out, that was impressive! Not a single item did she touch!

We are so proud to have the fine Horseboy crew in our store. Learn more about Horse Boy Foundation and their work.

 

 

Horse Boy Foundation at Whole Earth

What We’re Reading March 8,2013

What’s up this week? A brilliant pop-up book, the surfer who created GoPro, and a creature that’s hard to believe, even when you see it with your own eyes.

A decade ago Nick Woodman wanted a camera he could strap to his wrist so he could share his surfing exploits with his buddies. Ten years later, we call them GoPros. Read Forbes’ profile Nick Woodman.

Letterology posted Revolution – a brilliant paper engineering and stop-action video that tells the story of the cyclical journey of a drop of water.

It looks like a reject monster from a scifi movie, not something you’d see on Astronomy Picture of the Day. But it’s real – a micrograph of a Tardigrade perched on a moss leaf. What’s a Tardigrade? Perhaps the toughest creature on the planet.


This is yet another in a series of posts about what we’re reading at Whole Earth: stories about the environment, ecology, travel, outdoor living, ideas, art, writing, history, science, and creativity, and the people who make it happen. Have a suggestion? Please leave us a comment so we can add it to our reading list.

What We’re Reading March 1

Bower Birds, 3-D animations of nebulae, snowboarder Jeremy Jones and the perfect sunset at Yosemite – the best of what we shared this week.

Photographer C. Rowell
“For about one week each February, the setting sun hits the water of Horsetail Fall at such an angle that it glows, looking like a stream of lava against the darkened rock. The so-called firefall attracts hundreds of professional and amateur photographers from across the globe, who flock to Yosemite Valley to capture the ephemeral scene.”

Galen Rowell, Last Light on Horsetail Fall, Yosemite, California, 1973

“For most of us, the thrill of astrophotography lies simply in its beauty and power to reveal what our eyes cannot see. Now Finnish astrophotographer J-P Metsavainio has developed an experimental technique that takes ordinary astrophotography a step further: 3D animations of nebulae.”

Jeremy Jones, Austria, February 2012
“In 12 hours, we go out and experience nearly every emotion in the human range: physical strain, frustration, pain, anxiety, fear, calculation, the joy of making it to the top, the beauty of your surroundings, camaraderie, then the 60 seconds of adrenaline-filled activity.” Jeremy Jones

Photograph Dillon Marsh

“These massive, amorphous avian homes can support hundreds of birds at a time in their complex interior chambers and clusters, and, boy, are they impressive from the outside as well. The effect is somewhat otherworldly and–maybe this is just me?–kinda creepy, as the formations look like they are, or could be, super strange and sentient creatures living off our power grid.”

This is yet another in a series of posts about what we’re reading at Whole Earth: stories about the environment, ecology, travel, outdoor living, ideas, art, writing, history, science, and creativity, and the people who make it happen. Have a suggestion? Please leave us a comment so we can add it to our reading list.