What We’re Reading February 1, 2013

What a great week this has been at the office – we’ve found some surprising and thought provoking articles, images and even a documentary to share with you. Enjoy!

Nimbus D’Aspremont © Berndnaut Smilde

Nimbus D’Aspremont © Berndnaut Smilde

Berndnaut Smilde has collapsed the barrier between indoors and the natural world with his Nimbus art. His creations are so ephemeral that they exist for us only in photographs.

maja*majika / flickr

maja*majika / flickr

The U.S. Forest Service has found a curious connection between the loss of 100 million trees and the health of the humans living nearby.

triggerhapi / flickr

triggerhapi / flickr

There’s no universal definition of comfort, especially when it comes to temperature. Look what happened in Mexico when globalization trumped the traditional siesta.

Siberian taiga / wikicommons

Siberian taiga / wikicommons

What would it be like to spend over 40 years in the Siberian taiga, the world’s largest remaining wilderness, cut off from the rest of humanity? Would you have the skills to survive? The Lykov family did, but ….

Minette Layne / Flickr

Minette Layne / Flickr

Why do birds sing? To attract mates, to repel rivals, or do they sing for the sheer joy of it? Brainpickings posted a link to a BBC documentary that pits two evolutionary biologists against a philosopher in an attempt to answer the question – are birds musicians?

Saudi Arabia / Google Earth

Saudi Arabia / Google Earth

Paul Bourke has been traveling the globe via Google Earth collecting images showing fractal geometry at work on Earth’s landscapes.


This is yet another in a series of posts about what we’re reading at Whole Earth: stories about the environment, ecology, travel, outdoor living, ideas, art, writing, history, science, and creativity, and the people who make it happen. Have a suggestion? Please leave us a comment so we can add it to our reading list.