TreeFolks Sapling Giveaway – Austin Westgate!

sapling giveaway image

Mexican Oak image

win a six foot Mexican Oak!

Goldenball Leadtree image

Goldenball Leadtree
(Leucaena retusa)

Pecan Tree image

Pecan
(Carya illinoinensis)

Bur Oak Tree image

Bur Oak
(Quercas macrocarpa)

Carolina Buckthorn Tree image

Carolina Buckthorn
(Rhamnus caroliniana)
TreeFolks Logo

TreeFolks, a group dedicated to growing Austin’s urban forests, will be giving away saplings at our Austin – Westgate store (4477 South Lamar) on Saturday, November 10th from noon to 2pm. This year, Treefolks will be offering Goldenball Leadtree, Pecan, Bur Oak and Carolina Buckthorn saplings for planting. Approximately 300 saplings will be given away. You can also enter a drawing to win a six foot, container-grown Mexican White Oak!

Across the country Arbor Day is usually a Springtime event, but here in Central Texas Fall is the best time of year to plant trees. Cooler weather gives trees a chance to develop their root systems before being blasted by the summer heat. You may ask, why plant trees when we seem to be living in a time of perpetual drought? First of all, these trees are natives and have been chosen for their drought and heat tolerance. They will need to be watered – about one and a half gallons a week – but this amount can be easily captured from your morning shower or veggie washing water. Secondly, when it does rain, these trees provide a net gain for the water cycle, helping to recharge ground water and to slow and clean runoff.

Trees are vital in reducing the urban heat island effect. On a hot summer day, streets, roofs and parking lots can be 50 to 90 degrees hotter than the air, while shaded surfaces remain close to air temperature. All these super-heated streets and parking lots can increase average temperatures within the city by as much as five degrees Fahrenheit. Strategically planting trees to shade streets, sidewalks and roofs is one of the best ways to help keep our city cooler.

Since 1989, Treefolks volunteers have planted more than 250,000 trees in the Austin schools, parks, medians, right of ways, community gardens and greenbelts. These trees help preserve Austin’s quality of life by cooling the air, cleaning precious water and providing an urban forest that keeps Austin green and in touch with the natural world. To learn more about TreeFolks, their volunteer programs, classes and sapling giveaways visit their website.